Guardian readers’ collective tut at Neil Clark

10 08 2007

Neil Clark and the commenters in The Guardian‘s Comment is Free (a little too free it seems)

Calls from pro-war bloggers for Britain to grant asylum to Iraqi interpreters are truly nauseating.

The interpreters did not work for “us”, the British people, but for themselves – they are paid around £16 a day, an excellent wage in Iraq – and for an illegal occupying force. Let’s not cast them as heroes. The true heroes in Iraq are those who have resisted the invasion of their country.

As Seumas Milne wrote in yesterday’s Guardian: “More than any other single factor, it has been the war of attrition waged by Iraq’s armed resistance that has successfully challenged the world’s most powerful army and driven the demand for withdrawal to the top of the political agenda in Washington.”
If more Iraqis had followed the example of the interpreters and collaborated with British and American forces, it is likely that the cities of Iran and Syria would now be lying in rubble.

Before you rush to condemn Iraqis who feel ill disposed towards the interpreters, ask yourself a simple question: how would you view fellow Britons who worked for the forces of a foreign occupier, if Britain were ever invaded? History tells us that down through history, Quislings have – surprise, surprise – not been well received, and the Iraqi people’s animosity towards those who collaborated with US and British forces is only to be expected.

More here

UPDATE:
Kamm on Clark. Here.
Harrys Place on Clark’s article. Here.
James Forsyth with a short post about the article at Spectator. Here.
Also Stephen Pollard on his Spectator blog. Here.

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